How to choose a radiator for your living room

Radiators come in a wide variety of types, shapes, sizes and colours and choosing the right one for your home can be overwhelming.

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Considerations

The style you choose will depend on your taste, the type of décor you have and the layout of your room. Making sure it looks good and is effective at heating the room are the biggest priorities.

Your home reflects the way you and your family live and the living room is one of the main rooms in your home, where people congregate and spend time together. Matching your radiator with the colours and furniture in your room will ensure you are happy with your investment, so it is often best to determine the look you want first, then choose a radiator that complements this. For example, although traditional cast iron radiators are very popular, if your living room is very modern and contemporary in design, then this particular style will look out of place.

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BTU (British Thermal Units) are used to measure a room’s required heat output. Companies such as Apollo Radiators (http://apolloradiators.co.uk/Products/View/3/54/7/category/roma/Apollo-roma-bespoke-steel-column-radiator) can calculate the size of radiator required using a BTU calculator, ensuring you are always comfortable throughout the winter months. With a colder than usual winter being predicted, it won’t be long before we are all spending cosy evenings indoors.

Radiator type and style

Once you have decided, you will need to consider other options such as size. Where your radiator will be fitted will help determine this, as well as how large the room is. For example, a large living room could benefit from a slow burn radiator made of iron or steel. These materials take a little longer to warm up, but provide steady heat throughout the day. In contrast to this, an aluminium radiator is incredibly quick to heat up and so is perfect for heating a smaller space.

Whether to go for vertical column radiators, or a horizontal panel is a style choice, but usually a vertical radiator is useful for smaller homes, where height can make up for a lack of wall space, whereas a horizontal design can fit into a more spacious room.

A radiator finish is an optional extra, with choices including chrome and anthracite. The efficiency of the radiator will stay the same, so this is all about the look.

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